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is not gng to go away. adam and steve are not going to be married if the supreme court goes against it. there's going to be children that are children of gay couples that are still going to exist. we're still going to have the practical issue to deal with. are we going to tell those children that their family is deserving of less recognition or that they come from a dysfunctional family? are we going to tell that couple that they have less of a right to love each other? so this issue is not going to go away. we have to remember, let's put a name and face to this, the case that's going in front of the supreme court edith winsler, 83 years old, spent 40 years with her partner thea. if thea had been theo, edith winsler would not have had to pay the $600,000 in estate taxes she had to pay when her partner died. that's what we're talking about. that's the kind of equality, but regardless of what the court decides, edith and thea are still going to love each other and still going to be a couple. >> the thing is that edith and t he a don't want separate but equal treatment under the law when it come
that no one in cold water could comprehend what had happened, including steve and jone pierce, close friends of both tom and dar's who learned of the murder from tom himself. >> i said the three of you were always together and he was crying and he said i know. i know. i should have been there for her. and then i said if you would have been, the three of you would be dead now instead of just dar. >> but just 24 hours into the investigation, detective jim carbon had al qaeda abandoned the theory that this was a random act of violence. >> it appeared to me that this was a staged breaking and entering to try to hide a homicide that took place. >> but according to detective carbon, whoever staged the burglary didn't factor in the weather that day. >> it got really warm. we had a huge snow meltoff. >> the ground around the farmhouse was unusually wet and muddy. >> so you would expect there would be muddy footprints from inside the residence from somebody who had come inside twha door. >> absolutely. >> was there any footprints? >> absolutely nothing. >> but there was a yellow bag in the basement,
on february 6th steve in florida called for input on black rock kelso capital, bkcc for all you home gamers. i didn't know it and introduced digging, black rock kelso invests in what are known as middle-market businesses, companies with revenues between $50 and $500 million. the stock yields a 10.4% yield which seems like a red flag, but as you know we find sky high yields a worry, but this is a investment company that trades with the elevated payouts. at the same time, we are a private equity player like black stone, more upside and more predictability. next up brett was one of my emeritus with one of the largest networks of assisted living, retirement and alzheimer communities in north america. they care for seniors who can't stay home alone anymore but not in need of nursing care is a stress full-time for everyone involved. the company on some 190 communities leases now is 141, about 30,000 units. i think emeritus is in the baby boom for my generation. did you get an excellent entry point here? let's check your tweets send to @jimcramer on twitter. visited twitter yesterday and had a terrif
tell me. neil: the details of which, not to relate, but at this time, everyone said, is this a steve jobs situation? do we know if he is sicker tha we think, you know that went. >> i remember. it was horrible, some articles that came out, one in particular from "wall street journal,." neil: i remember. >> it was tough on my family, it wa saying, you know you have cancer, it will be awkward. why put people in that position. >> did you ever just want to quit out right? >> absolutely not, i started something, i wanted to see it to a good spot, we had not closed with federal reserve yet. we were just about to do that transaction, i committed to people that i wanted to do it, neil, you have to live every day, until you can't. i was in a job, i was loving what i was doing, my family and i spending goo timin time toget. neil: did anyone say this is a threat to your life? you might die? >> for me? >> i was given 9 months to a year to live, so i knew i had until may until i was showing bad affects and i knew i had to work with the board on suck last thing i wanted for my family and tor to say
will have in california with the legislature. gerri: among many. let's be clear, steve. thank you for coming, always great to have you here. this is an example of what is wrong with this country, and i'm glad you're bringing it. unbelievable. more to come this hour. more to come including are we near the end of the government's role in fannie and freddie? and next, more sequester hiding the hypocrisy from the administration concerning our armed forces. i will break it down after the break. my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company throh legalzoom. never real thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom toelp people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. @@make your business dream a reality. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like
are not cheap. steve, the directer of the narc institute for early education research at rutgers was consulted by the white house. there's a number, estimated, one the president's plan, that early childhood education could cost up to $10 billion a year, rick. this goes in the line of more spending, more recovery. this is a lot of money. >> well, yeah, but here's the concern. i don't know how you can make the argument that 800,000 civilian defense workers losing their jobs can be good for the economy. i don't quite see how that's possible, and now on spending on preschool, look, what we're looking at now, forget the president's agenda to increase it. we're now looking at a major cut to head start because of the sequester. i don't know if that impacts on the economy today, but you can't tell me this is a good thing for the future when we take away the programs for kids. >> bottom line is, literally, barack obama needs more revenue. he needs another source. he just raised taxes on the risk, talking about closing deductions which is not enough. i'd like to predict they will eventually put another
. should you be using this company to build up your portfolio? ceo steve burke wits joining us coming up next in a fox business exclusive. ♪ thank you orville and wilbur... .amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create t future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you'reistory. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us inveing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleast gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. investor. yeah, ibut i'm a busy guy.or it used to be easier but now there are more choices than ever. i want to know exactly what i am investing in. i want to knowxactly how much i'm paying. i want to
will have in california with the legislature. gerri:mong many. let's be clear, steve. thank you for coming, always great to have you here. this is an example of what is wrong with this country, and i'm glad you're bringing it. unbelievable. more to come this hour. more to come including are we near the end of the government's role in fannie and freddie? and next, more sequester hiding the hypocrisy from the administration concerning our armed foes. i will break it down after the break. [ male announcer ] what?! investors could lose tens of thousands of dollars in hidden fees on their 401(k)s?! go to e-trade and roll over your old 401(k)s to a new e-trade retirement accou. none of them charge annual fees and all of them offer low cost investments. e-trade. less for us. more for you. from the united states postal service a small jam maker can ship like a big business. just go online to pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. we'll do the rest. ♪ uh, charles couldn't make it. his single miles card blacked him out here and here. he should have used... the capital one venture ca
and tucks in my pants. neil: steve, it is always good to have you. on that issue, whether it is big on that issue, whether it is big oil or anything above, saying [ male announcer ] you are a business pr omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. national. go like a pro. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in erything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. got you ! you cannot escape the rebel forces ! ahhh. got you ! got ya ! gotcha ! got ya. that's all you got, brother ? take that. never having to surrender the things that m
. joining me now on the future of the republican party, former congressman steve laterette. good morning. >> good morning to you. >> give me your take. how would you describe the current state of the gop? is the tea party the future? >> it's not the future. the tea party is an important component, but it's not the republican party. and, you know, we have to become a national party. in order to become a national party, i know you're from fair port harbor, ohio, and we have to compete in places like that if we want to elect the president of the united states. >> you know, it is interesting when you look at where your party is now. politico has this new article about the influence of a couple younger guys. marco rubio, rand paul, and how they're taking the reins. it's rubio and paul dominating the show. this wing of the party has its own version of the republican national committee, the heritage foundation. the aggressive, wealthy brothers and the club for growth. together these groups hold the cards when it comes to the most important political issues facing the party. do that i? >> no, i
at the conservative political action conference known as cpac. we'll also hear from congressman steve king of iowa. this is an hour, 15 minutes. >> five to six years ago the national debt was not really a big deal. people didn't even know we had a national debt or deficit. but then a grassroots movement known as the tea party started to emerge. [cheers and applause] and what made the tea party so effective was not only it came from the grassroots, but it had three core values; fiscal responsibility, constitutionally-limited government and free markets. and because of the tea party, we were able to put patriots like michele bachmann, joe walsh into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. [applause] we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, please welcome jenny martin from the tea party patriots. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> thank you. [cheers and applause] picture this: college students in this country who are optimistic about the future and look forward to living the american dream. after colle
that the cyprus crisis will not be fixed any time soon and will come with serious consequences. steve sedgwick is standing by with the latest from there. but first our own michelle crew c caruso-cabrera is live in cyprus. >> reporter: the situation here grows increasingly desperate. they're down to the wire. cyprus government has to make a decision about what they're going to do. look at the lines that have started to form at nearly every atm of the bank here in cyprus, this liky is considered one of the weakest. they're still able to get money out of the atms in cyprus though banks have been closed all week and won't reopen until tuesday at the earliest. people in line are quite frightened because they know that this is the weakest bank and there had been rumors about it. it is likely to be part of any consolidation effort is that ultimately is what happened. that's every single day likely to be the case. listen to what one man said. he's been taking out money every single day. >> i just took $1,000. i've been taking $1,000 every day. personally i'm taking this money and cash with me to the u
today the little rockers, and steve on guitar, jeff on keyes and michael harper on drums. guys, it's great having you here. >> thank you. >> mike: your blend of music is pretty incredible because you kind of cross every genre imaginable. marcus, how do you maintain some versatility with the type of music you do? >> well, it helps that we love all of these different genres that we sing and just performing music that we love makes a big difference. we pick every song on the album and pick every song on the show because we love great music with great melodies and a positive inspiration and portray to the crowds and listeners. >> mike: the biggest thrill ever is say peering on this show and i know you feel that way. >> having you play with us. [applause] >> and that's what usually happens, it's downhill from here. but we want to play a song that's going to be on your next album and really is kind of interesting, the texas tenors doing a tennessee song with a guy from arkansas. we're trying to cover all the bases, but i think that people are going to love this and it's a little song ca
is available on- line at politico dot com. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> steve king and michele bachmann and former house speaker newt gingrich where among the speakers saturday at the conference. this is about one hour, 20 minutes. the to six years ago, national debt was not a big deal, and then a grass-roots movement, known as the tea party, began to emerge. [cheers and applause] and what made the tea party so effective is not only did it come from the grass roots, but it had three priorities, including fiscal responsibility, limited government, and free markets. because of the tea party, we were able to put candidates like michele bachmann into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome a representative for the tea party patriots. ♪ coming up ♪ >> thank you. picture this. college students who are optimistic about this future and look forward to living the american dream. they becomege, parents and put food on the table for the
within the gop with matt kibbie of freedom works and former congressman steve latourette of the republican mainstream partnership. >>> the u.s. responds to north korean threats by beefing up its missile defense as the president heads to israel. we will ask our sunday panel whether mr. obama has the right answers to foreign policy challenges around the world. and our power player of the week. a celebrity chef combines the classic with the cutting edge. all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again and happy st. patrick's day from fox news in washington. the president met with republicans and democrats in both the house and senate this week. but for all of the talk of a grand bar gain there was no sign the two parties are any closer to bridging the divide over our nation's debt. we want to discuss the chances for a deal with two key senators. dick durbin the senate's number two democrat joins us from chicago. tennessee republican bob corker is in chattanooga. gentlemen, while the president was meeting with members of congress, house republicans and senate democr
another game changing supervise high impact thing. the kind of thing that steve jobs was famous for. you know, the stock market has been skittish. consumers who like apple products are looking for something big. maybe it's not in phone maybe it's the long rumored television set. they're working on a super smart watch. they've got to do something. there is pressure on apple. samsung has for several years, i've talked to samsung executives privately in korea and here for several years. they don't care about any other competitor. their aim has been totally a appear al. there's pressure on tim cook and apple to delight the public again with something big. and their next big event is going to be in the spring, juneish, may or june. and we'll see what they do. >> rose: blackberry has a new device coming out. >> i don't think apple feels nearly as much pressure. i don't think it's remotely close. the pressure they feel is from sat sung. >> rose: thank you so much, glad to have you. >> glad to be here. >> walter mossberg from the wall street journal. stay with me. >> rose: i began this trip
win elections. that steve core knacky is 1-1. they hope to reverse the massive losses. over 6%, i'm told, of black voters back mitt romney. 6%, and that number seems high to me. you cannot win with number like that especially when people of color will soon be the majority in this country. also, our plans to improve communication wet voers while also cutting the number of presidential debates. why let you know what you really think. they want to move the convention earlier in the summer so they can tap into cash sooner. that's a great idea. and there is a push to close the digital media and tech gaps and all this sounds easily achievable if you listen to preebus. >> we know we have problems. we've identified them and we're implementing the solutions to fix them. to be clear, our principles are sound. we will do a better job of connecting with people, to our principles, showing how we can help every american climb the economic ladder. especially in communities we haven't been in a long time, but b what it means to be paubl. the rnc cannot and will not write off any demographic, comm
's, the decline steepens for the average person. steve trachtenberg is 75. >> i'm still cooking with gas, but i'm not the man i was at 65 or 55. >> solman: even so, trachtenberg thinks traditional retirement at age 65 is too young. >> people live longer now and are healthier longer now. but i think having an age at which the institution and the individual could together decide whether the person ought to retire would be a useful thing. >> solman: trachtenberg says 70 would be a good age to do that. so why does he continue to work at 75? >> well, if we had the conversation, i'd push back. i'd say, no, im still working! >> everybody's situation is different. >> solman: george mason psychology professor lou buffardi is retiring this spring at age 70. but he doesn't think everyone should. >> there are many folks my age and older who are remaining at the university and are some of our very best people. >> solman: sure, says claire potter, but there's a catch. >> i think one of the things you get if you have an aging faculty is, there's a kind of break on innovation that is unnecessar
is the one we're all surprised about is steve carrell's movie, who came in at number three at just $10 million. if you're going to see one wizard, one magician movie this weekend, it's probably going to be "the wizard of oz." >> rob schuter -- >> thank you. >> we love you. >>> all right, making spring cleaning fun. >> is that possible? >> we put cleaning tricks to the test. >>> start of spring is just a where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep, and lunesta eszopiclone can help you get there, like it has for so many people before. do not take lunesta if you are allergic to anything in it. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or
ill advised for whatever reason. first iowa republican congressman steve king with the solution for illegal immigration in the form of a construction project on the house floor. >> you can't shut that off unless we build a fence and wall. i want to put a fence in and a wall in. i designed one. this would be an example, then, of how that wall would look. you can also deconstruct it the same way. you can take it back down. i also say we need to do a few other things on top of that wall. one of them put a little bit of wire on top to provide a disincentive for people to climb over top or put a ladder there. we can electrify this wire, not a current that would kill anybody, but would be a deterrent. we do it in livestock all the time. >> now for one that made the loser list. it never came to fruition. "just before advocates for senior citizens plan to host on stage a 24-foot cabin cruiser bearing the slogan "medicare vouchers are a titanic mistake," the capitol police sank the reference judging the symbolic titanic too heavy for the stage. authorities banished it to the side deprivi
at steve croft interview with obama and clinton. that's humiliating. you wouldn't have seen that on "60 minutes" back 40 years ago. they would have been ashamed to put something on like that. i think there is a affinity with this administration. in the bush years there was a lot of hard hitting stuff opposed to bush, especially after the iraq war went south. then they felt all guilty. they should have done x, y and z in the beginning. they were really tough. i think there really is a difference in how hard hitting the networks are depending on whether there is a conservative or a liberal in office. >> bill: i agree 100%. call them low information voters are becoming the majority in this country because there isn't information out there anymore. >> it's buried on the internet. >> bill: not on the internet. it's all skewed. you know, objective hard-hitting, uncovering things. if you don't know information, much rarer than it used to be. >> do you think the "times" or the post or the globe or 00 "l.a. times" 30 years ago was objective? what you had then was a liberal monopoly on the netted
to get this medicare, this health insurance -- there was a big article by steve bril on cover of "time" magazine. we've got to crack down on the nps'. they're making too much money. >> well, my answer is, some might be making a lot of money. but at nps, we characterize the value and this is what we're offering. and this is why, despite our price, the payers are understanding the value of gatex and reimbursing -- >>y wert take care of these people and try to get them normal lives or we wreck their lives. >> exactly right. not only they will cost the system but not be productive for society either. >> why should they be doomed if you have something for them? >> exactly. and something that works. >> okay, dr. nader, thank you so much. that's francois nader, president and ceo of nps pharmaceuticals up huge today. i don't think it's done. two drugs that are big. "mad money" is back after the break. ♪ ♪ i don't want any trouble. i don't want any trouble either. ♪ [ engine turns over ] you know you forgot to take your mask off, right? [ siren wailing in distance ] ♪ [ male announcer ]
to within a few of an all-time high. steve leaseman tells us where we go from here. >> the federal reserve voting 11 to 1 to keep its policy in place and purchasing $85 billion a month in treasury and mortgage-backed securities in an effort to drive down long-term interest rates. but the federal reserve chairman in the press conference after the statement came out, suggested that the fed may reduce the amount of monthly purchases if he sees sustained improvement. >> we are seeing improvement. i think one thing we would nee
to pass and those are the budgets that most americans agree with. >> new york congressman steve israel. thank you. >>> still ahead, poll divide. from the budget to same sex marriage. even guns. when it come to these hot button issues, we'll look at why congress and the american public appear to be on totally different pages. we're also following the manhunt for the kill here gunned down colorado's prison chief. officials are now investigating a link between the murder and the chief's refusal to extradite a saudi national. >>> don't forget as always, you can join our conversation on twitter. you can find us there. hey. they're coming. yeah. british. later. sorry. ok...four words... scarecrow in the wind... a baboon... monkey? hot stew saturday!? ronny: hey jimmy, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? jimmy: happier than paul revere with a cell phone. ronny: why not? anncr: get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announ
you out much business. they will try to boycott your businesses as we saw with hobby lobby. steve greene who has that chain of craft stores employs tens of thousands of people they might shut that chain of stores down because of what they are dealing with. >> bill: the chicken thing? >> they are doing okay. look, i think the better way of looking at this maybe, bill, is we were never promised a rose garden. if you are a traditional just catholic even a traditional muslim. your holly book does not tell you that you are going to have an easy time of it being a faithful person. we are all flawed. as christians we believe we are all sinners, we fall down every day and try to get ourselves back up. we do believe there is san ideal. even though sometimes we can't live up to it it's up to us as christians to spread the good word. to neighbors, to friends, to be as faithful as we can. >> bill: that's a nice theory. it ain't happening. >> not a theory we are not doing that to the extent we need to so the society is becoming more secular. >> bill: there is no national leader in this country
-- committed suicide. >> that's right, my very close friend of mine in college, steve schneider, similar people, we both grew up, he grew up in ohio, i indiana, both pitchers on the baseball team and we both studied math at harvard. so he was someone i grew close with in college. and sort of observed the degradation in his mental state and it ended with him taking his own life. about seven years ago now. and so yeah it was very difficult process to observe and it certainly built some deep seeded motivation in me to understand what was happening. >> rose: if you were doing all this over, would you go in a different direction? i mean would you have gone into some aspect of life sciences directlrather than coming the way that did you through mathematics and computer science and writing code? wince don't think so. you know, i feel like i studied some life sciences while in college. so i spent some time in courses on neuroscience and computational neuroscience and it seemed clear to me that many of the innovations were going to be happening in the development 6 novel sensors to generate more data ab
i'll call for steve or or john from el paso county sheriff's office. >> inspect john st. augustine with the el paso county sheriff's office. i want to first begin by -- >> all right. you're listening to a press conference there in texas as authorities are talking about how they are cooperating in texas with colorado authorities as they try to look into these two separate shooting incidents and trying to determine whether indeed there is a link between the person, the suspect who was -- who died who was shot and killed there in texas and if there's a link between that person and the corrections chief that was shot right outside his home in colorado springs. let's go to jim spellman once again joining us there in colorado springs. again, jim, give us an idea of where authorities are going from here as they try to draw a connection between these two situations. >> first thing they want to do is see if they can link any evidence found at the crime scene of the tom clements murder here in colorado with that car. i asked does that mean shell ka casings, fingerprints, but they wopt tell m
's a conservative institute on the campus. >> i want to read mark simone my pal steve forbes tweets capitalism is the most moral system because it respects man's rights. now stanford may not agree with that but do i. >> you're being a little out dated. we're in the obama economy. a college student doesn't need to study capitalism, moves into his parents house, lives there until he's 30. is on their health care plan. where do you find a professor to teach the joys of capitalism. >> there has to be somebody out there. >> they are there but they are a vanishing minority. >> capitalism is freedom. i appeal to your higher spirits. there must be an agreement with us some place. capitalism is about freedom. live, liberty and pursuit of happiness is done best through the free market capitalist system. >> i agree with you, larry. i don't know what stanford is doing. obviously they can do what they want because they are a private university and we have freedom of speech but i certainly would encourage the teaching of capitalism on campus. but i think you're all on a different planet. liberals are very s
and that the program would come back where it begin in the 1950s in manhattan with steve allen. new state bill expected to be signed into law would give a 30% tax credit for relocated television production. the measure lists several other qualifications. all of which seem to describe the history of "the tonight show." how convenient. new jersey devil's legend martan brotherhood. i don't watch hockey. third career goal. he didn't shoot the puck. the other team messed up a pass. the puck bounced off the boards and right into the other net. see there? the net minder was last player to touch it. so he gets the goal. the month of march has gone mad with upsets. they ended last night with a stunner for harvard and started back up today with a hottie tottie for the ages. my rebels and the rest coming up. [ mom ] a new game? that'll save the day. so will bounty select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet. look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbent than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand. use less, with bounty select-a-size. has an equally thrilling, lesser-known counterpart.
the whole going from rick, the bureau chief, on to rich, who covered the national security council, steve roberts, and marty schulte who were alternating congress and white house, bernie, the foreign diplomatic correspondent, and they weave in and out. i'll do a long one of marty. primarily because it tells what it was like there without exception if you started in the new york times at that time. marty said, got a bachelor of law degree and then i went into the service for two years and came out and took a v.a. course called, how to get a job. the burden of which was something to do -- go for had gone you're interested. and i wrote 110 makes and i was offered copy boy jobs, mailroom jobs. took the one at the new york times. when you got that job, according to the v.a. course, consider at it food in the door and make yourself useful to the people doing the work you've whatnot to do, and some day a task will come and somebody will be on a project or on vacation or sick and they'll look at you and say, what the heck, he knows how to bring us coffee, how to rip copy of off the machine. give
solicitor general and steve gillis, one of his former law clerks and they help shepherd through this process. neither of them that the well either and i think they and he made a terrible strategic mistake -- to strategic mistakes. first they made a strategic mistake and believing these hearings have any intellectual con tent. [laughter] seven senators asked him questions and he took them seriously but they had no intellectual content. the senators serge knew what he thought. he left a huge trip record. the correct way to proceed with this political theater. this is something his hearings taught everybody send a note hearing since bork to and handled anything like it. the second error he committed is related to the first. 50 to assess and intellectual exchange, is that the senators earlier entries in the substance, he responded with utmost gravity and not with levity. as i said, bob trent great is the funniest men i've ever met. the only person close as justice ginsburg's has been. he was quicker than anybody seen. most of the questions deserved what it your body should have done this produce
saw millenials who were there at "occupy wall street," celebrating the life of steve jobs, which took place -- his death took place at the same moment that was going on. and it was this great way of showing they we that millenials believe that corporations are part of our world, while they can stand and say we disagree with the financial practices, we can still celebrate a great corporate titan and leader and innovator and thinker, and being able to hold both beliefs at the same time is one of the hallmarks of this generation, we can hold in our head, we don't like these approximates but we celebrate the great things that american business and american leaders can do. >> host: a lot of people will remember looking back on "occupy wall street," a lot of news clips of someone putting the microphone and a camera in a young person's face and asking why you're here, and young people not really being able to define the point. and actually, that might have been by design, and that might have been a success -- a mark of success. eric hopper writes in true believer, the nature of mass movemen
of your life when you drop your iphone and all you can do is pray to steve jobs that it won't land face down. sometime soon that might be a problem of the past. the apple insider has discovered the company has filed a patent for a device that can detect when your phone is in freefall. it will then shift the center of mass so the phone will land on its engine stead of its screen. that's the hope anyway. what's more annoying than harvard totally destroying your ncaa bracket? well, for me at least online ads. they beg you to refinance your that y heod n noticed.belly fat but thosea companies tt push those ads your way?they pr you. the group enliken put out a survey to give consumers a real sense of how data mining companies view them and respondents found that up to half of what they know is wrong. now i now know the pain personally. earlier i spoke with the cofounder of enliken and he explained just how these companies can be so off base. >> so, mark, i filled out your survey and here is everything they got wrong about me. they say i am a college student. a community activist. a family ch
of the world. steve liesman on his way soon to westchester county. robert, who knows where he's going. what it might mean for russia's rich. >> nondisclosed location. >> tyler, i'm looking at the markets and the commentary coming in to my e-mail. i think knee-jerk contagion is now becoming contagion as some investors doubt that what's going on in cyprus is really raising concerns about the positive insurance worldwide. citi group in a report that just came out, contagion risks are over rated in our view. the risk of bank runs in other euro area countries has clearly risen but the unique features of the cypriot situation should limit the read through to other cases in the euro area. in case you didn't know this, issuing a strong statement the reassure american depositors. while the situation in cyprus is a real concern for the depositors in cypriot's banks, depositors in the u.s. banks are insured. the cyprus debacle is the sort of thing that has kept the fed on age and as gresive stance on monetary policy. fed would increase by 85 billion in additional mortgages because it's already on edge
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